Echo Weblog

a blog about my daily life, passions and happenings

When in Rome …” Exhibition at Corinium Museum, Cirencester

Calligraphy is a kind of music not for the ears, but for the eyes. (V. Lazursky)


The Corinium  museum open its doors to the Gloucestershire Lettering Arts (GLA) exhibition “When in Rome..” from 14 Feb 15 to 15 Mar 15). The main goal of the GLA Society is  to raise the level of awareness of calligraphy, lettering and the book arts. The exhibition ‘When in Rome’  presents a variety of calligraphy and lettering arts.


The word Calligraphy (comes from the Greek καλλιγραφία — “beautiful handwriting”) — is the art of beautiful and clear writing.

I took a calligraphy class years 14 years ago to learn how to do this. I started with foundational hand which is the key to other forms of lettering learned about the history of the development of calligraphy about materials and methods of use, writing patterns, decorations. It was a magical experience and I found the course fascinating.  You can see an example of my lettering work here:



Calligraphy is a magical skill that demands time and focus allow us to express ourselves creatively, teach us determination and patience, and elevates the soul.

Seeing the most recent exhibition at the Corinium museum I have re-discover my love for calligraphy.


Visiting the exhibition you can see on display the four volumes of contemporary work done in response to the Lindisfarne Gospels in 2013 by just over 200 contributors from around the UK, including 6 from GLA, and some from Japan and Portugal.


The calligraphers were asked by the International Research Centre for Calligraphy at the University of Sunderland to contribute original work in a fusion of styles to bring together old and new, with a balance of planned direction and freedom to use their own skills and enjoy making the book together. And this was achieved in a remarkably short period.


The finished pages were displayed in the Cathedral during the Writing 2013 Calligraphy Symposium at Durham while the original Lindisfarne Gospels were exhibited there. These pages were later bound in 4 volumes, called “Letters after Lindisfarne”, and presented to Durham Cathedral Library to be used as a lasting educational resource alongside their medieval manuscripts.


People should go along to see the exhibition what the modern calligraphers have achieved, taking the medieval manuscripts of the Lindisfarne Gospels as their inspiration for the books and the Roman theme for the exhibition.


Calligraphy is a unique art is a skill worth preserving for the future generations!

Single Post Navigation

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: Logo

You are commenting using your account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: